American Academy Blog

Exploring the “Archeology of Social Practice”

July 14, 2014 at 12:02 pm Comments are off for this post
  1.  Societies across nations practiced modalities of social interventions. Social Work, as a concept and profession, warrants some self-refection to reinvent itself.
  2. On-line proliferation of SW’s knowledge, values and skills repudiates many—most—of our assumptions of practice. There is hardly a unique function that SW can exclusively claim. The evidence of our obsolescence and inanity are pervasive.
  3. Meaningful self-transformation is an ongoing process. But a decade is a good projection provided SW administrators could eschew their own delusions.
  4. Yes, indeed. This whole project calls for “Unification of Social Work” (1999), which is fundamentally interdisciplinary.
  5. Innovation begins with an idea. The problem of contemporary SW is its lack of any original idea. We cannot survive let alone serve as a parasitic identity. So, let begin with an idea (without becoming our own nemesis). 137 words